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Connecting Klipsch computer speakers to receiver

  • Hello all, I have the Klipsch promedia 2.1 speakers for my computer. I have a relatively new sony receiver sitting around that I'm not using. Audio stuff 
    is really not my strong point so I'm going to need some help here. How could I connect my Klipsch speaker system to the sony receiver? I'm not sure if I
    will need additional cables or not. The Klipsch speakers consist of two satellite speakers, and one subwoofer. The satellite speakers connect to the subwoofer via standard speaker cable. There is also a cable which comes from the speaker with the volume control on it that plugs into the subwoofer, I believe this is what powers the speakers.

    So with all of this in mind, how would I go about connecting the speakers and the sub to the receiver?
  • get a headphone splitter from radioshack.  This will give you 2 green jacks, one for the speakers, the others for the sound system.

    Then get a male minijack to female RCA adapter from radioshack.  This will change the shapes of the connectors for you.

    Then get the appropriate length of RCA cable to reach your receiver. Plug the RCA cables into the reciever inputs and change to that input.

    Enjoy 

     

    EDIT:

    I misread your post, what the others said is correct 



    [edited by: kunzy]
  • If you want to have your 2.1 speakers run from your sub, you have two choices.  One is if your receiver is equipped with a headphone jack.  My guess would be the headphone jack is probably 1/4".  You'll need to go from a 1/4" male jack down to a 1/8" female jack.  These adapters are very common.  Another way is to use one of your outputs like a tape out or a pre-out of your receiver and go from a RCA male pair down to a 1/8" mini jack female.  If you can't find an adapter like this as most of them end with a 1/8" male jack, you can get a female to female 1/8" coupler.  I prefer the latter as you remove the headphone amp from the mix.  Many headphone amps are not the greatest quality and manufacturers just throw them in as an after thought.
  • Doesn't really sound like there's an easy way to do this. What about those boxes that come with speaker systems. You know, the ones that sit on your desk and have the volume control and additional imputs in the back. I don't know what they're called.
  • You really should only need an RCA with left and right into a stereo headphone jack most likely.  Hook the RCA's into your tape out(any decent receiver should have a tape out) so your not feeding the Klipsch to much power by using the speaker out.

    As long as the receiver is not over 55 watts per channel you can always hook up the satellite speaker directly but they are only 3 inch drivers so they will be easy to blow with a decent receiver.  My denon only puts out 60 watts continuous but will hit 130 or so on short burst, I've blown out my Klipsh KG2's  before. It keeps it more simple the other way.



    [edited by: natesuniverse, natesuniverse]
  • When you typically have blown drivers is because the amp was driven into clipping.  Clipping destroys more speaker than speakers being over driven due to too much power.

    Hooking up the satellite speakers to the receiver directly is a bad idea all the way around.  The satellite speakers most likely do not have their own crossover networks.  The crossover is typically in the sub/bass module which filters out the bass frequencies out of the signal feeding the satellites.  Unless you know the satellite's particular frequency response characteristics, you'll be guessing in the dark on where to set your crossover point.  Provided your receiver has this functionality.

  • Thats what I like about my denon receiver though is once you set the bass, treble and variable loudness correctly it will not clip.  To bad they don't still use the variable loudness control as it is very useful if you don't want to go through an equalizer. Better drivers than the old ones through Klipsch were only $60 dollars also, so it kind of was worth it to upgrade. Plus I got them when I was around 16 so they are over 20 years old and still sound great.
  • It's good you like your Denon and it is performing to your expectations.  But I guarantee you that your Denon will clip if driven hard enough.  Any amp will clip if driven hard enough.  You may not notice it immediately.  Onset of clipping can be very subtle like a slight compression of dynamics.  The obvious is distortion in the highs.  Setting the bass and loudness appropriately will help in minimizing any clipping issues as bass is always the number one culprit in sucking power from an amp.  If you're overboosting the bass, you're pushing the amp to drive that setting with your speakers at what ever volume level you are listening at.

    If you don't listen to your system at loud or elevated volume levels, yes, you will probably never drive your Denon into clipping.  But that's true with any amp whether it be a high dollar Krell to the cheap crappy headphone amps in your laptops.  Sometimes, you may not realize you have the volume set too high as it depends on the music/sound you are listenting to to your room's environment; whether it has a lot of sound absorbing materials or just the shear size of the room itself.  Another consideration with many receivers, the power ratings for them are overly optomistic.  A manufacturer may advertise a receiver as having 100Wpc RMS.  But many times, the power rating was obtained by driving one channel at a time.  When you see specs for separate power amps, you'll sometimes see the same spec but it'll say something like this.....100Wpc RMS all channels driven.  Which means the rating was obtained by driving all the channels at the same time.  And if a spec for a separate power amp doesn't say all channels driven, it's implied.  Why is this important?  It's because it's a measure of the quality and the strength of the power supply in the amp or receiver.  With any good amp design, the power supply is the heart and soul of the amp.  If the power supply can't keep up with the power demands of the amp channels then that will be just the same as driving the amp into clipping.  It doesn't matter if the amp channels have MOSFET transistors capable of cranking 100Wpc if the power supply can't keep the transistors fed with adequate power.

    A side note about equalizers.  EQs are not evil in of themselves.  It's how people use them is what gives them a bad rap.  The tone controls on many of your audio components IS a form of EQ.  The bass control is typically centered around 100 Hz while the treble is typically centered around 10,000 Hz.  Each tone control has a set amount of boost and cut which ranges from +/-6 dB to about +/-10-12 dB.  The loudness contour is usually centered around 40 Hz and the amount of boost is typically locked to the volume control setting even though it may not be pointed out in black and white.  Proper use of an EQ is to try to get the in room response of any reference tone to be as flat as possible.  In theory, you want your room to have a measured response of 0 dB off reference levels when compared to the reference signal from 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz.  By using an EQ and an RTA, you can dial in a system to try to get it as close to reference and as flat as possible.  Having a flat response isn't ideal in many cases due to personal listening preferences and comparisons to live performances where the sound may still not sound right in the room in comparison.  So an EQ is not an evil device if used correctly.

  • Lets see do I want to f**l with three knobs that basically set the equalization where I want it or do I want to mess with a 10-20 band EQ every time I change or switch listening sources or media. Oh yeh, with everything set correctly it may clip a little, to bad I don't have an oscillicope so I could tell, but I do have very discernable ears and can tell very easily when something isn't right. But If you want to go ahead and throw some technical mumble jumble out there that I already know more power to ya.  Yeh I've listened to suck a$$ sony systems that start to clip at around 4, funny my system doesn't have those same issues on 10. So believe what you what you want to.  Yes I have pushed it into clipping before when everything isn't set right, but when set right????????????? Set it where it doesn't clip then drive it into clipping then back it off, sorta simple formula.
  • natesuniverse:
    Lets see do I want to f**l with three knobs that basically set the equalization where I want it or do I want to mess with a 10-20 band EQ every time I change or switch listening sources or media. Oh yeh, with everything set correctly it may clip a little, to bad I don't have an oscillicope so I could tell, but I do have very discernable ears and can tell very easily when something isn't right. But If you want to go ahead and throw some technical mumble jumble out there that I already know more power to ya.  Yeh I've listened to suck a$$ sony systems that start to clip at around 4, funny my system doesn't have those same issues on 10. So believe what you what you want to.  Yes I have pushed it into clipping before when everything isn't set right, but when set right????????????? Set it where it doesn't clip then drive it into clipping then back it off, sorta simple formula.

    Christ.....being a tad bit mellow dramatic aren't we?  First you say your Denon never clips and now you're saying it might "clip a little."  If you understand all the technical mumble jumble, your original response about your Denon never clipping would have been worded a tad bit differently.  60Wpc isn't a heck of alot of power depending on the room as I've hit near 100Wpc for long durations on some listening sessions I've had.  The comments about 4 or 10 or 10000 for a volume level is meaningless.  My Meridian surround processor has volume increments from 0 to 99.  That means I must be really jamming because my default volume level is set at 65.

    To refocus on how we went down this tirade, the discussion was over not overpower speakers because it will damage speakers.  I said the vast majority of speaker damage is caused by under powering speakers with amps that go into clipping.

    Take a step back and take the discussion as a technical discourse for those that may benefit from any technical information exchange instead of getting all bent out of shape because I'm putting information out that is counter to yours.