Discussion {{'2009-04-16T19:05:50-07:00' | moment:'fromNow'}}

Using Linux to recover data from Windows.

Using Linux to recover data from an inaccessible Windows system. We all have faced a Windows machine with a blue screen of death, or worse, a black screen with white letters stating an error. Usually what is corrupted is the Windows operating system itself, but the user's files are still there, intact. ......

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Written on {{'2011-10-09T04:04:03-07:00' | moment:'fromNow'}}
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[quote user="ladytekki"]

Using Linux to recover data from an inaccessible Windows system.


We all have faced a Windows machine with a blue screen of death, or worse, a black screen with white letters stating an error. Usually what is corrupted is the Windows operating system itself, but the user's files are still there, intact. The idea is to use Linux to access those files and copy them to another medium.

Depending of the computer in question we have a few option: Running a Live-CD from the optical drive and copying the files in a USB Key. Booting the Linux distro from a USB drive, and saving the data burning it into a CD/DVD, another USB drive, or external hard drive.

For this demonstration I'll be running Fedora KDE, booting both from a USB-key, and a Live-CD. To find information about booting from an USB drive, please check this thread: Resources for running Linux from a USB drive.

After booting Fedora, and deciding in where the files will be stored. The first thing is to locate them. Clicking through this path:Computer\Home. In order to see the drives. In this example, we can see them at the right of the screen, under Places.



In this next picture, we can see all the drives (Volumes). Clicking on each one, will show their content. In this case, I'm dealing with a computer using Vista that is infested with spyware. Before reformatting, I need to recover some pictures from an user's folder named e-pc.



I continue clicking until I found the folder I'm looking for. Once on that folder, I right click to copy the folder.





Afterward, I look under the 'places' menu, which in any other distro could be called 'Storage Media'. And click on the USB Volume. Once the USB content is displayed, I right click anywhere on it, and paste the folder I copied before. That's it. The files are now stored inside the USB-key.



If a USB-key is no handy, and it is a desktop with two optical drives. The Live-CD can be run from one, while the data is burn on the other. Opening a burning application, in this case K3b.





The way to access the files from the burning application is slightly different. BTW, when K3b opens, being run from a live CD or USB, there will be a couple of customizing screen that should just be shutdown. Once inside the program, I click looking for the Root folder, there I click over the media folder, showing up the disks (volumes) available.




Once again, keep clicking until finding the right folder, which will be added to a data burning project. Completing our data rescue exercise.


[/quote]

 

Thanks Lady!! [:D]

Imma add your post to my Fav hehe. [egypt]

Written on {{'2009-04-16T19:36:09-07:00' | moment:'fromNow'}}
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You definitely seem to be our Linux guru, you should hang out in the chat room there are a lot of Linux questions most of us don't know how to help with.
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